What we talk about when we talk about grief

Kids don’t like being called kids but they’ll proudly tell you their precise age. Adults too, prefer to define themselves rather than have a label stuck on them. As an adult and former kid, maybe this is why I’m getting bored of the word grief.   There’s more going on with me than grief and grief too has more going on inside it.   To find … Continue reading What we talk about when we talk about grief

Trauma and the holidays

For advice on how to get through the festive season while coping with a reaction to trauma, I spoke to Dr Claudia Herbert, Director of the Oxford Stress and Trauma Centre.   Much of the guidance on how to look after yourself when you are experiencing a reaction to trauma, talks about avoiding too much stimulation. Don’t push yourself too hard. Don’t force yourself to … Continue reading Trauma and the holidays

Insights from a career coach

Bereavement can make us create dramatic changes in our lives. A drop in household income can make some changes essential. I asked one of the UK’s leading career coaches, Corinne Mills of Personal Career Management, how best to handle big career moves at a time like this.
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A beginner’s guide to buying a gravestone

We asked Yvonne Wilson of the National Association of Memorial Masons for her recommendations on how to get this most heartfelt of purchases right.
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How to tell people you’re not crazy without sounding crazy

Dr Mark Goulston is one of America’s leading psychiatrists and the author of many books, including Just Listen. Discover the Secret of Getting Through to Absolutely Anyone. He can tell you what to say in the most challenging or seemingly hopeless of situations.

I asked him about a common predicament for newly widowed people. Continue reading “How to tell people you’re not crazy without sounding crazy”

Three ways to build support and empathy in your family

Three things you can do with your children to help you all support each other after a bereavement, by Karen Holford of the Association of Family Therapy.
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The Iron Passage: Grief’s Summons to Growth by James Hollis, Ph. D.

James Hollis, Ph. D., Jungian Analyst in Washington, D. C., is author of many books including Swamplands of the Soul,  Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life,  and What Matters Most
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Self-care for campaigners

The death of a loved one prompts many of us to take up fundraising, campaigning or even starting our own charities. It can be a valuable way of meeting people in a similar situation, creating something meaningful out of a tragedy and keeping busy as we adjust to all the changes in our life.
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Politicians talk funeral poverty

Stories of families being unable to afford funerals have hit the headlines. The campaign for Fair Funerals has won awards and the support of a national newspaper. But what are the politicians doing?
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Humanist funeral ceremonies

An interview with Trevor Moore of The British Humanist Association
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Getting through the holidays – bonus

The last in our Getting Through the Holidays series is from the excellent people at Mary Ann Evans Hospice and The Warren Bereavement Services. For those of us still dreading the 25th it is a group cheer that says, You can do it! from a lot of people who have been there. And as one of them says, Christmas is only one day. By Saturday … Continue reading Getting through the holidays – bonus